SESSION MATERIALS

Course name:2008 Competing Narratives of Suffering: Soviet and Fascist Crimes in Poland and Ukraine
Course description:
Key speakers and discussants:
Polina Barvins'ka
Natalia Kovalchuk
Liuba Kozik
Yulia Kysla
Olena Panych
Yulia Soroka
 
Questions:
 
Who is Marek Jan Chodakiewicz, and can we trust what he writes?
Is there a zero-sum competition between the memory of the Holocaust and the memory of Soviet terror?
Is it possible to disentangle communist and Nazi crimes?
Is it possible (and morally acceptable) to equate or hierarchize communist and Nazi crimes?
Are the competing memories constructed?
How do they seem to have been constructed?
How has professional history fared in the competition among victims?
What should be the role of institutes of national memory?
What do we know about the institutes of national memory in Poland and Ukraine?
 
 
Course owner:John-Paul Himka
Bibliography:

Bibliography for everyone:

 

Shafir, Michael. Between Denial and “Comparative Trivialization”: Holocaust Negationism in Post-Communist East Central Europe. Analysis of Current Trends in Antisemitism, 19. Jerusalem: The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, The Vidal Sassoon International Center for the Study of Antisemitism, 2002.

 

Chodakiewicz, Marek Jan. “The Dialectics of Pain: The Interrogation Methods of the Communist Secret Police in Poland, 1944-1955.” Glaukopis 2/3 (2004-05): 1-54.

 

Michlic, Joanna. “The Soviet Occupation of Poland, 1939-41, and the Stereotype of the Anti-Polish and Pro-Soviet Jew.” Jewish Social Studies: History, Culture, Society n.s. 13, no. 3 (Spring/Summer 2007): 135-76.

 

Bibliography for session participants:

 

Forum on Jan Gross's Neighbors in Slavic Review 61, no. 3 (Fall 2002): 453-89.

 

Himka, John-Paul. “Ethnicity and the Reporting of Mass Murder: Krakivs’ki visti, the NKVD Murders of 1941, and the Vinnytsia Exhumation.” Typescript.

 

Himka, John-Paul. "War Criminality: A Blank Spot in the Collective Memory of the Ukrainian Diaspora." Spaces of Identity 5, no. 1 (April 2005).

 

Jilge, Wilfried. “Competition Among Victims? The Image of the Other in Post-Soviet Ukrainian Narratives on World War II.” In Shared History - Divided Memory: Jews and Others in Soviet Occupied Poland, 1939-1941, ed. by Elazar Barkan, Elizabeth A. Cole, and Kai Struve, Leipzig: Leipziger Universitätsverlag 2007 (=Leipziger Beiträge
zur jüdischen Geschichte und Kultur; 5), forthcoming.

 

Added Files:
Shafir, Michael. Between Denial and “Comparative Trivialization”: Holocaust Negationism in Post-Communist East Central Europe
Chodakiewicz, Marek Jan. The Dialectics of Pain: The Interrogation Methods of the Communist Secret Police in Poland, 1944-1955
Michlic, Joanna. The Soviet Occupation of Poland, 1939-41, and the Stereotype of the Anti-Polish and Pro-Soviet Jew
Himka, John-Paul. Ethnicity and the Reporting of Mass Murder: Krakivs’ki visti, the NKVD Murders of 1941, and the Vinnytsia Exhumation. Typescript
Himka, John-Paul. War Criminality: A Blank Spot in the Collective Memory of the Ukrainian Diaspora. Spaces of Identity 5, no. 1 (April 2005)
Jilge, Wilfried. Competition Among Victims? The Image of the Other in Post-Soviet Ukrainian Narratives on World War II
Forum on Jan Gross's Neighbors in Slavic Review 61, no. 3, part 1
Forum on Jan Gross's Neighbors in Slavic Review 61, no. 3, part 2
Forum on Jan Gross's Neighbors in Slavic Review 61, no. 3, part 3
Forum on Jan Gross's Neighbors in Slavic Review 61, no. 3, part 4
Forum on Jan Gross's Neighbors in Slavic Review 61, no. 3, part 5
Diana Dumitru, The Use and Abuse of the Holocaust: Historiography and Politics in Moldova
EWA WOLENTARSKA-OCHMAN. Collective Remembrance in Jedwabne. Unsettled Memory of World War II in Postcommunist Poland
SLAWOMIR KAPRALSKI. The Jedwabne Village Green? The Memory and Counter-Memory of the Crime